CONSISTENTLY DELIVERS

Oct 6, 2014

NC Politics in the News - October 6, 2014

EDUCATION

The way North Carolina high schools assign A’s and B’s could soon change as the state Board of Education examines the standard grading scale.
 
ELECTIONS
Republican 2nd District Congresswoman Renee Ellmers and her Democratic challenger, singer Clay Aiken, clashed Monday during an hour-long debate in Pinehurst, each accusing the other of being too closely bound to their party leadership.

A controversial natural gas extraction process that might never be used in Western North Carolina is becoming a big part of a mountain Senate race.
 
After the 2010 decennial census, when changes in population and demographics prompted the state’s legislature to lay out new electoral boundaries, the state’s 7th Congressional District took on a new, Republican-voting county and a candidate who in 2012 came just a matchstick’s length from unseating the district’s long-serving Democrat, Rep. Mike McIntyre.
 
With the final two debates coming up this week between the Republican state House Speaker Tillis and the Democratic incumbent Hagan, it’s worth asking the question: Do debates matter?
 
A federal appeals court panel Wednesday ruled that parts of North Carolina's new voting law should be set aside while lawsuits are pending, creating confusion three weeks before early voting is set to begin.
 
Partisanship dominates Congress, state legislatures and plenty of city and county political bodies, too.
 
ENERGY
Gov. Pat McCrory announced on Tuesday his three appointments to the new N.C. Coal Ash Management Commission despite his reservations about the new board’s constitutionality.
 
Triangle and Triad drivers saved an estimated $18 million on gasoline this summer after the state persuaded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that drivers could stop using a more expensive fuel blend that was thought – incorrectly – to reduce air pollution, the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources said Wednesday.
 
HEALTH CARE
State health officials told lawmakers Monday that they need about $6 million more a year to fix the medical examiner system, which has failed to meet minimum national standards for staffing, training and facilities.
 
State lawmakers are promising swift action to fix North Carolina’s broken system for investigating suspicious deaths.
 
North Carolina’s infant mortality rate was 7.0 per 1,000 live births last year, which tied 2010 as the lowest in the state’s history, state health officials said this week.
 
STATE GOVERNMENT
There’s a difference between drones and the remote-controlled airplanes hobbyists enjoy. So notes a new law effective Wednesday that firms up the definition of “unmanned aircraft,” colloquially known as drones, for statewide regulation.
 
Last year North Carolina set aside $10 million to be divided equally among victims of the N.C. Eugenics Board program. Victims had until June 30 to submit a claim form.
 
TRANSPORTATION
The Federal Aviation Administration said in a letter last week that it hasn’t considered the issue of who should control Charlotte Douglas International Airport because the city of Charlotte hasn’t made a formal request – something the City Council has said it has no interest in doing.
 
 
Please contact the Raleigh McGuireWoods Consulting team if you have any questions or comments:
Harry Kaplan, Senior Vice President
 
Jeff Barnhart, Senior Vice President
 
Franklin Freeman, Senior Vice President
 
John Merritt, Senior Vice President
 
Johnny Tillett, Senior Vice President
 
Kerri Burke, Vice President
 
Bo Heath, Vice President
 
Sarah Wolfe, Assistant Vice President
 
Katy Feinberg, Vice President, MWAdvocacy