CONSISTENTLY DELIVERS

Mar 3, 2014

NC Politics in the News: Campaign Filing & Election Analysis

 

Election season is here, and the races are set. The candidate filing period in North Carolina closed at noon on Friday, February 28. Currently, nearly a third of the state’s 170 lawmakers are unopposed, essentially guaranteeing their re-election. Specifically, 44 House incumbents, and 11 Senate incumbents are completely unopposed. 
 
The fate of many more will be known after the Primary election on May 6, 2014, as a handful of incumbents in the Senate and House face a primary election only, and five open-seat districts face a primary only. 
 
As for the rest of the candidates, some will face both a primary and general election, while others face the general election only on November 4, 2014. The Senate can plan to welcome one new member, Andy Wells. Representative Wells has one term in the House under his belt and enters the Senate race unopposed in District 42. 
 
NC HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Incumbents with General Election Only: 48
Incumbents with Primary Election Only: 11
Incumbents with No Opposition: 44
Incumbents with Both Primary & General: 9
Open Seat with General Election Only: 1
Open Seat with Primary Election Only: 4
Open Seat with Both Primary & General: 4
Open Seat with No Opposition: 0
 
NC SENATE
Incumbents with General Election Only: 25
Incumbents with Primary Election Only: 7
Incumbents with No Opposition: 11
Incumbents with Both Primary & General: 1
Open Seat with General Election Only: 0
Open Seat with Primary Election Only: 1
Open Seat with Both Primary & General: 3
Open Seat with No Opposition: 1
 
 
To view a breakdown of the individual candidates running for each NC district click the link below:
 
 
IN THE NEWS
Early analysis of General Assembly races gives Republicans the upper hand, with both parties targeting their efforts and money at a relative handful of competitive districts.
 
North Carolina’s Sen. Kay Hagan, a Democrat, filed for reelection in Raleigh this week — officially launching what promises to be a bruising, high-profile race that could determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.
 
 North Carolina's top judicial leader appeared likely to be Republican for years to come and GOP U.S. Rep. Robert Pittenger got a late primary challenge from a tea party supporter as candidate filing ended Friday.
 
The power of incumbency, gerrymandered election districts, and a growing national distaste for politics in general might be the causes of having voter ballots for the May 6 primary election showing more blanks than the responses to a pop quiz.
 
 
 
Please contact the Raleigh McGuireWoods Consulting team if you have any questions or comments:
 
Harry Kaplan, Senior Vice-President
 
Jeff Barnhart, Senior Vice-President
 
Franklin Freeman, Senior Vice-President
 
John Merritt, Senior Vice-President
 
Johnny Tillett, Senior Vice-President
 
Kerri Burke, Vice-President
 
Bo Heath, Vice-President
 
Sarah Wolfe, Research Assistant
 
Katy Feinberg, Strategic Communications