CONSISTENTLY DELIVERS

Jun 30, 2014

NC Politics in the News - June 30, 2014

 

NC Policy Watch

There are less than 24 hours left in the fiscal year, and lawmakers begin this week much as they began last week – snarling at one another over competing projections of Medicaid spending.
 
Medicaid is the biggest stumbling block in budget negotiations. There’s been a conflict over how much money is needed and some sharp exchanges between the Senate and State Budget Director Art Pope.
 
Just when lawmakers hoped to finish the legislative session, hostility among Republican leaders flared amid negotiations on the $21 billion state budget plan.
 
House lawmakers are making doubly sure the State Bureau of Investigation is moved out of the Attorney General's Office. The language for the move was added to Senate Bill 529, a criminal justice omnibus that was sent swiftly to the House floor Thursday for its first of two votes.
 
Like a movie rushing to its climax, supporters of North Carolina’s film industry Wednesday mounted a last-ditch fight to keep the incentives they say make the state a favorite location for Hollywood.
 
Just days after Gov. Pat McCrory signed a bill creating a public-private partnership to attract jobs and promote trade and tourism in NC, the new partner began offering jobs to some current employees of the Department of Commerce.
 
A bill to make it possible for the families of children with epilepsy to get an experimental hemp extract is near final passage in the General Assembly.
 
The Senate gave its initial approval for coal ash regulation Tuesday evening, but the debate revealed a divide in the chamber.
 
Elections
 
Political pundits across the nation are watching closely this year as North Carolinians prepare to head to the polls to decide whether first-term Democratic U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan will keep her job. Republican N.C. House Speaker Thom Tillis is her chief opponent. Fred Barnes, Fox News contributor and Weekly Standard executive editor, is focusing much of his attention on North Carolina’s U.S. Senate race. He explained why during a conversation with Mitch Kokai for Carolina Journal Radio.